From The Nutritionist

Global Nutrition Team
Authors:
Global Nutrition Team

Trending in Nutrition: Our Top Predictions on Emerging Food and Nutrition Trends




Fall kicks off a season of celebrations for a lot of people—from Halloween to the New Year, families will enjoy their favorite traditions. But for food companies, the fall kicks off trend forecast season! We’ll see trend reports from insight organizations, new product launches, and top picks from fellow dietitians. This year, we are sharing our nutrition and food trend predictions that we expect to see at shows like the 2018 Food & Nutrition Conference & ExpoTM and in popular trend reports shared by the media.


Intuitive Eating- Taking the Diet Out of Dietitian
Intuitive eating is a set of eating principles outlined by dietitians Evelyn Tribole and Elyse Resch back in 1995. This eating philosophy focuses on listening to your body’s cues on hunger and fullness and encourages people to reject the diet mentality of labeling foods as good or bad. This approach gained momentum over the last couple of years and continues to capture the attention of consumers and health professionals alike. Although still niche, younger consumers are becoming more familiar with the trend and many dietitians incorporate the techniques into their practice.1 Want to give it a try? Learn about some of the basics from the founders and check out other resources available online, like the ones offered here.


Indulgences Evolved
Nutrition professionals are familiar with phrases like “no foods are off limits,” and “everything in moderation”. But, indulgence is no longer just about fulfilling that desire for a sweet treat, it also includes the experience involved with enjoying a food or beverage. For example, the rich, buttery taste from your favorite cookie, the chocolate chips that melt on your tongue, and the crispy texture that leaves crumbs in your lap are all part of the experience of eating. Indulging doesn’t always mean decadence, either. Enjoying the warmth of a cup of tea in your hands or the comfort of hot soup in a moment that is just for you are a couple of examples of how this trend evolved.


Functional Foods
In the 80’s and 90’s, supermarket aisles were full of light, fat free, and diet foods. Back then, people were focused on taking things out of food like calories and fat. Now, people think of food more holistically, seeking out functional benefits from real foods like vegetables, healthy fats, whole grains, and herbs. Popular benefits include hydration, energy, and plant-based protein. We expect this trend to continue with both familiar ingredients in unexpected places and the use of new ingredients in familiar foods. For example, think of how cauliflower found its way into pizza crust and the use of traditional spices like turmeric became more popular in juices.


Increased Buzz About Gut Health
No list of nutrition trends would be complete without talking about gut health. The focus on gut health started in the yogurt and supplement space, but steadily expanded across many categories. Interest in prebiotics and probiotics fuels product innovation and research. This trend ranges from a preventative focus on improving gut health to managing sensitivities like carbohydrates found in garlic and onions. New products on the market make it easier for consumers to prepare meals without cooking everything from scratch. For example, products like Prego® Sensitive Recipe Traditional Italian Sauce make it easier for these consumers to eat within their dietary restrictions.

We expect to see many publications and fellow food and health professionals share their predictions on health and well-being trends over the next couple of months. As these forecast reports come out, think about what you notice in your practice, what questions your clients are asking, and what products resonate with them the most. By understanding the trends and how they are relevant to your patients, you can help them find solutions that make them more successful on their health and well-being journey.


Happy Forecasting,

The Campbell Nutrition Team


Lindsay's Bio

Lindsay is a nutrition communications analyst at the Campbell Soup Company where she coordinates health professional and consumer communications. She also works with internal and external partners on retail health and wellness programs. Prior to her role at Campbell, Lindsay worked as an in-store retail dietitian. She received her Bachelor of Science in Nutrition and Dietetics from West Chester University and completed her dietetic internship with Pennsylvania State University. Currently, Lindsay is studying for her Master of Science in Health Communications and Marketing with Boston University.


Kate's Bio

Kate received her bachelor's degree in dietetics from the University of Delaware and completed her dietetic internship at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. She has over ten years of experience in a variety of nutrition-related practice areas including clinical nutrition, weight management counseling, health and wellness and nutrition education. Kate has worked as a nutrition consultant to the Campbell Soup Company since 2005.


References

  1. 2018 Food and Health Survey. International Food Information Council. Available at https://www.foodinsight.org/2018-FHS-Report-FINAL.pdf. Accessed September 15, 2018.

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En Papillote Technique

1. Prepare the parchment paper
Get a large piece of parchment paper, approximately 2.5 times as large as a single portion of food. Cut the paper into a heart shape, lightly brushing one side with oil. This creates a slight barrier to water, preventing the paper from becoming soaked too quickly. Another option, though not as attractive, is to use tin foil instead of parchment paper.

2. Select the ingredients
This is a very quick-cooking approach, so it works best with tender proteins such as fish and shellfish. The accompanying ingredients, like julienned vegetables (matchstick size), must be small enough to cook at the same rate as the fish. In some cases the vegetables can be blanched, or quickly cooked in boiling water, to ensure proper doneness. Fresh herbs will go a long way in providing flavor.

3. Assemble the packet
Lay the oiled, heart-shaped paper on a baking tray, oiled side up. Season your vegetables with salt, pepper, extra virgin olive oil, and half of the herbs. Toss them around for an even coat. Place enough for one portion on half of the paper. Bunch them up to create a bed for your fish, leaving about two inches between the food and the edge of the paper. Place the seasoned fish on the vegetables and sprinkle the remaining herbs. Add a splash of the liquid on top of the fish, just enough to add moisture.

4. Seal the packet
To seal, fold the heart over to enclose the fish and vegetables (so it resembles a teardrop). Starting at the top of the heart, fold about 1/4" of the edge toward the center. Fold over again to create a seal. Continue along the length of the parchment, folding each section twice. When you get to the point of the heart, twist and fold to finish the seal.

5. Bake your dinner
Bake the packet in a 425°F oven for 10-14 minutes, depending on the size of the fish. The packet will puff and brown while in the oven and as the steam builds. When cooked, remove from the oven and carefully place the packet on a plate. With a knife or scissors cut an "X" on the top and fold back the edges for a dramatic presentation and a delicious, healthy meal.

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Spicy Flounder and Clams with Summer Vegetables

Prep Time: Less than 20 minutes
Cooking Time: 10-14 minutes
Yield: 2 servings

Ingredients:

  • 1/3 cup carrots, finely cut julienne
  • 1/3 cup sugar snap peas, cross cut thinly
  • 1/3 cup zucchini, yellow, finely cut julienne
  • 6 each cherry tomatoes, cut in half
  • 1 Tbsp. shallot, minced
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tsp. parsley, fresh, minced
  • Dash salt
  • Dash black pepper
  • 6 oz. fillet, flounder (2 fillets, 3oz. each)
  • 2 Tbsp. Low Sodium Spicy Hot V8® 100% Vegetable juice
  • 3/4 lb. clams, in the shell

Instructions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 425°F.
  2. Combine the carrots, sugar snap peas, zucchini, cherry tomatoes, shallot, garlic, extra virgin olive oil, half of the parsley, salt and pepper in a bowl. Toss well to combine.
  3. Lightly oil two large heart shaped pieces of parchment paper.
  4. With the parchment paper on a sheet tray, place half of the vegetable mixture in the center of one half of each heart leaving about a 2" border.
  5. Lightly season each fillet with salt and pepper. Fold or roll the fillet to create a uniform thickness and place on top of the vegetables.
  6. Top the fish with the remaining herbs and the Low Sodium Spicy Hot V8® 100% Vegetable juice.
  7. Place half of the clams around each portion of vegetables and fish.
  8. Fold the heart over to enclose the fish and vegetables so that it resembles a teardrop.
  9. Starting at the top of the heart, fold about 1/4" of the edge towards the center. Fold over again to create a seal.
  10. Continue with this method along the length of the parchment packet folding each section twice to make an attractive edge.
  11. When you get to the point of the heart twist and fold to finish the seal.
  12. Bake the packets for 10-14 minutes (depending on the thickness of the fish).
  13. Remove from the oven and serve by cutting an "X" in the top and folding back the edges.

Nutrition Information (per serving):

Calories 180, Total Fat 9g, Saturated Fat 1g, Monounsaturated Fat 5g, Polyunsaturated Fat 1g, Cholesterol 50mg, Sodium 450mg, Carbohydrate 10g, Fiber 2g, Sugar 4g, Protein 16g.