From The Nutritionist

Kate Williams, RD, LD
Guest Author:
Kate Williams, RD, LD

What is Organic all about?

Consumer demand for organic products in the United States continues to grow. Organic products are available in nearly 3 out of 4 traditional supermarkets and in 2012, accounted for about 4 percent of total U.S. food sales. Although produce is the highest selling organic food, other food categories like packaged/prepared foods, breads and snacks are gaining sales.1 According to the Organic Trade Association’s 2013 U.S. Families’ Organic Attitudes and Beliefs Study, 81% of U.S families now report buying organic products at least sometimes, and note buying more than the previous year. Why? According to the above noted study, almost half of consumers who buy organic do so because they believe they are healthier for their families.2 As consumer demand for organic products increases, so does availability, variety and interest in what organic is all about.

What does organic mean?
For a food to carry the “USDA ORGANIC” seal it must meet strict standards established by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) organic certification process. Organic foods are those that are produced without the use of man-made fertilizers, pesticides, irradiation, or genetic engineering. These standards require the incorporation of practices that promote conservation of natural resources and protect the environment

(for example, improve soil and water quality).3 Part of the certification ensures that the product is protected from prohibited substances from raw to finished product.



What are the requirements for organic labeling of products?

Many products can be considered for the organic certification—think beyond the produce aisle. Crops, wild crops, livestock, and processed/multi-ingredient items can all be considered for organic certification.1

Categories of "Organic" Labeling Requirements/Description Labeling Notes
100% Organic
  1. All ingredients must be certified organic.
  2. Any processing aids must be organic.
  3. Product labels must state the name of the certifying agent on the information panel.
  1. May include USDA organic seal and/or 100 percent organic claim.
  2. Must identify organic ingredients (e.g., organic dill) or via asterisk or other mark.
Organic
  1. All agricultural ingredients must be certified organic, except where specified on National List.
  2. Non-organic ingredients allowed per National List may be used, up to a combined total of five percent of non-organic content (excluding salt and water).
  3. Product labels must state the name of the certifying agent on the information panel.
  1. May include USDA organic seal and/or organic claim.
  2. Must identify organic ingredients (e.g., organic dill) or via asterisk or other mark.
Made with Organic
  1. At least 70 percent of the product must be certified organic ingredients (excluding salt and water).
  2. Any remaining agricultural products are not required to be organically produced but must be produced without excluded methods.
  3. Non-agricultural products must be specifically allowed on the National List.
  4. Product labels must state the name of the certifying agent on the information panel.
  1. May state “made with organic (insert up to three ingredients or ingredient categories).”Must not include USDA organic seal anywhere, represent finished product as organic, or state “made with organic ingredients.”
  2. Must identify organic ingredients (e.g., organic dill) or via asterisk or other mark.
Specific Organic Ingredients
  1. Multi-ingredient products with less than 70 percent certified organic content (excluding salt and water) don’t need to be certified. Any non-certified product:
  1. Must not include USDA organic seal anywhere or the word "organic" on principal display panel.
  2. May only list certified organic ingredients as organic in the ingredient list and the percentage of organic ingredients. Remaining ingredients are not required to follow the USDA organic regulations.

Chart Source: LABELING ORGANIC PRODUCTS

http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/getfile?dDocName=STELDEV3004446&_sm_au_=iVV1NP6D4VrVDDpv

What does Campbell have to offer?

Campbell works hard to add more options to your pantry and fridge so that you can enjoy a variety of foods and flavors. In addition, Campbell values the opportunity to responsibly manage our agricultural resources. This January, Campbell is launching a new line of Organic soups that delivers superb taste. This collection of new soups impart flavor-packed goodness with delicious varieties like Campbell’s® Organic Chicken Tortilla and Campbell’s® Organic Garden Vegetable with Herbs soup. Campbell also offers Swanson® Organic Chicken and Vegetable Broths which are 99-100% fat free with no MSG added and have 1/3 less sodium than regular Swanson® Chicken and Vegetable Broths. Try some in your next cooking venture.

Whether you always buy organic products, sometimes buy them, or never buy them, embrace each eating occasion an opportunity to try something new and fuel your body with nutritious and delicious foods. Keep in mind all foods in moderation can fit into a healthy lifestyle.


Try Something New!

Kate

Kate received her bachelor’s degree in dietetics from the University of Delaware and completed her dietetic internship at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. She has over ten years of experience in a variety of nutrition-related practice areas including clinical nutrition, weight management counseling, health and wellness and nutrition education. Kate has worked as a nutrition consultant to the Campbell Soup Company since 2005.

1. http://www.ers.usda.gov/topics/natural-resources-environment/organic-agriculture/organic-market-overview.aspx   Organic Market Overview. Accessed Sept 15th, 2014

  1. http://www.ota.com/organic-consumers/consumersurvey2013.html  Organic Trade Association. Accessed Sept 16, 2014.

  2. http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/getfile?dDocName=STELPRDC5101547  Organic Certification of Farms and Businesses Producing Agricultural Products. Accessed Sept 15th, 2014

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En Papillote Technique

1. Prepare the parchment paper
Get a large piece of parchment paper, approximately 2.5 times as large as a single portion of food. Cut the paper into a heart shape, lightly brushing one side with oil. This creates a slight barrier to water, preventing the paper from becoming soaked too quickly. Another option, though not as attractive, is to use tin foil instead of parchment paper.

2. Select the ingredients
This is a very quick-cooking approach, so it works best with tender proteins such as fish and shellfish. The accompanying ingredients, like julienned vegetables (matchstick size), must be small enough to cook at the same rate as the fish. In some cases the vegetables can be blanched, or quickly cooked in boiling water, to ensure proper doneness. Fresh herbs will go a long way in providing flavor.

3. Assemble the packet
Lay the oiled, heart-shaped paper on a baking tray, oiled side up. Season your vegetables with salt, pepper, extra virgin olive oil, and half of the herbs. Toss them around for an even coat. Place enough for one portion on half of the paper. Bunch them up to create a bed for your fish, leaving about two inches between the food and the edge of the paper. Place the seasoned fish on the vegetables and sprinkle the remaining herbs. Add a splash of the liquid on top of the fish, just enough to add moisture.

4. Seal the packet
To seal, fold the heart over to enclose the fish and vegetables (so it resembles a teardrop). Starting at the top of the heart, fold about 1/4" of the edge toward the center. Fold over again to create a seal. Continue along the length of the parchment, folding each section twice. When you get to the point of the heart, twist and fold to finish the seal.

5. Bake your dinner
Bake the packet in a 425°F oven for 10-14 minutes, depending on the size of the fish. The packet will puff and brown while in the oven and as the steam builds. When cooked, remove from the oven and carefully place the packet on a plate. With a knife or scissors cut an "X" on the top and fold back the edges for a dramatic presentation and a delicious, healthy meal.

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Spicy Flounder and Clams with Summer Vegetables

Prep Time: Less than 20 minutes
Cooking Time: 10-14 minutes
Yield: 2 servings

Ingredients:

  • 1/3 cup carrots, finely cut julienne
  • 1/3 cup sugar snap peas, cross cut thinly
  • 1/3 cup zucchini, yellow, finely cut julienne
  • 6 each cherry tomatoes, cut in half
  • 1 Tbsp. shallot, minced
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tsp. parsley, fresh, minced
  • Dash salt
  • Dash black pepper
  • 6 oz. fillet, flounder (2 fillets, 3oz. each)
  • 2 Tbsp. Low Sodium Spicy Hot V8® 100% Vegetable juice
  • 3/4 lb. clams, in the shell

Instructions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 425°F.
  2. Combine the carrots, sugar snap peas, zucchini, cherry tomatoes, shallot, garlic, extra virgin olive oil, half of the parsley, salt and pepper in a bowl. Toss well to combine.
  3. Lightly oil two large heart shaped pieces of parchment paper.
  4. With the parchment paper on a sheet tray, place half of the vegetable mixture in the center of one half of each heart leaving about a 2" border.
  5. Lightly season each fillet with salt and pepper. Fold or roll the fillet to create a uniform thickness and place on top of the vegetables.
  6. Top the fish with the remaining herbs and the Low Sodium Spicy Hot V8® 100% Vegetable juice.
  7. Place half of the clams around each portion of vegetables and fish.
  8. Fold the heart over to enclose the fish and vegetables so that it resembles a teardrop.
  9. Starting at the top of the heart, fold about 1/4" of the edge towards the center. Fold over again to create a seal.
  10. Continue with this method along the length of the parchment packet folding each section twice to make an attractive edge.
  11. When you get to the point of the heart twist and fold to finish the seal.
  12. Bake the packets for 10-14 minutes (depending on the thickness of the fish).
  13. Remove from the oven and serve by cutting an "X" in the top and folding back the edges.

Nutrition Information (per serving):

Calories 180, Total Fat 9g, Saturated Fat 1g, Monounsaturated Fat 5g, Polyunsaturated Fat 1g, Cholesterol 50mg, Sodium 450mg, Carbohydrate 10g, Fiber 2g, Sugar 4g, Protein 16g.