From The Nutritionist

guest-experts/laura.jpg
Author:
Laura Masullo, M.S. R.D.

Heart-Healthy Eating Has Never Tasted So Good –
Tips for American Heart Month

Can you guess which disease is responsible for killing one in three Americans? You got it—heart disease. Claiming over 780,000 American lives annually, heart disease, sometimes referred to as cardiovascular disease, remains the nation’s number one killer.1 While efforts to reduce death and disability in men have improved, only one out of five women is aware that heart disease is her top health threat.2 So for American Heart Month, let’s talk about what you can do to fight this deadly disease—for you and the women you love.

First, know the risk factors. Many things contribute to heart disease. While some are genetic, other risk factors can be controlled through lifestyle modifications. These include smoking, overweight and obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, and physical inactivity; if you have one or more, don’t be overwhelmed—even small changes can make a big difference! Tackle each one at your own pace:

  • Stop smoking. You may associate smoking with lung cancer, but smoking actually damages other parts of your body too, including your heart and blood vessels. If you currently smoke, aim to quit. Check out the American Heart Association’s® resources page for tips on quitting.

  • Get moving. Physical activity can help improve cardiovascular health, so it’s no surprise that the American Heart Association® recommends adults get at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity each week.3 Daunting as it may sound, meeting this goal is as simple as a 30-minute brisk walk five days of the week. Be sure to start off slow and spread out your activity to avoid injury and exhaustion, especially if you’re currently sedentary. To learn more about how to be active your way, click here.

    Note that if you currently have high blood pressure or high cholesterol, new guidelines from the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association® advise that adults get three to four 40-minute sessions of moderate-to-vigorous intensity exercise per week.4

  • Manage your weight. Your heart is happier when you’re at a healthy weight. If you’re not sure whether you need to shed some pounds, first determine your body mass index (BMI)—a good indicator of weight status. If your BMI is 25 kg/m2 or higher, strive to achieve a healthy weight by burning more calories than you eat. Determine your calorie needs and visit our weight management section for great tips on healthy weight loss.

  • Eat heart-healthy. Diet is another part of your lifestyle that can be modified to prevent heart disease. First let’s focus on the “negative” nutrients, which include saturated fat and trans fat (solid fats), cholesterol, and sodium. How much should you aim for each day?

    • Saturated fat: < 7% of total calories, or 5 to 6% if you have high cholesterol4
    • Trans fat: < 1% of total calories
    • Cholesterol: < 300 mg
    • Sodium: < 2,300 mg, with further reduction to 1,500 mg if you’re 51 and older, or are African American or have hypertension, diabetes, or chronic kidney disease5

    Limiting intake of these nutrients might seem restrictive and cumbersome—but if you keep in mind the overall dietary pattern rather than individual foods, you’ll find it’s easier—and more delicious—than you thought! A heart-healthy diet is not a prescription; it’s a flexible way of eating that incorporates many nutrient-dense foods: vegetables, fruits, whole grains, legumes, low-fat dairy, nuts, and non-tropical oils, with limited intakes of sweets, sugar-sweetened beverages, and red meat. Visit USDA’s MyPlate to find out how much you should eat from each food group.

Campbell to the rescue! Eating for your heart doesn’t mean you have to sacrifice flavor. Campbell’s® Healthy Request® soups are a tasty way to mix up the mundane. Visit our Product Nutrition Finder to learn more about our products. Check “heart healthy” to explore our products that meet that criteria. Check out the Campbell Healthy Eating Plan to see how you can incorporate our products, including Campbell´s® soups, Prego® sauces, V8® beverages and Pepperidge Farm® bread, into a healthy dietary pattern. Just pick the plan most appropriate for your calorie and sodium needs—Campbell offers a 2,000 or 1,600-calorie plan, each available at 2,300 mg and 1,500 mg of sodium. Each one includes a seven-day menu consistent with the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans and the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet, which are both recommended by the American Heart Association®.

Cheers to Heart Health!
Laura.


Laura’s Bio:

Laura received her bachelor's degree in nutritional sciences from Rutgers University and completed her dietetic internship at New York-Presbyterian Hospital. She worked for the Campbell Soup Company as an intern and contractor for two years, and has returned to Campbell after completing her master's degree in human nutrition at the University of Delaware. Laura is a member of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and the New Jersey Dietetic Association.

Please note that the Heart-Check Food Certification does not apply to scientific research by an organization other than the American Heart Association® or links to other information unless expressly stated.


References

1. Go AS, Mozaffarian D, Roger VL, Benjamin EJ, Berry JD, Blaha MJ, Dai S, Ford ES, Fox CS, Franco S, Fullerton HJ, Gillespie C, Hailpern SM, Heit JA, Howard VJ, Huffman MD, Judd SE, Kissela BM, Kittner SJ, Lackland DT, Lichtman JH, Lisabeth LD, Mackey RH, Magid DJ, Marcus GM, Marelli A, Matchar DB, McGuire DK, Mohler ER 3rd, Moy CS, Mussolino ME, Neumar RW, Nichol G, Pandey DK, Paynter NP, Reeves MJ, Sorlie PD, Stein J, Towfighi A, Turan TN, Virani SS, Wong ND, Woo D, Turner MB; on behalf of the American Heart Association Statistics Committee and Stroke Statistics Subcommittee. Heart disease and stroke statistics—2014 update: a report from the American Heart Association. Circulation. 2014;129:e28–e292

2. Causes and Prevention of Heart Disease.
https://www.goredforwomen.org/about-heart-disease/facts_about_heart_disease_in_women-sub-category/causes-prevention/ Accessed December 13, 2013.


3. http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/GettingHealthy/PhysicalActivity/StartWalking/American-Heart-Association-Recommendations-for-Physical-Activity-in-Adults_UCM_307976_Article.jsp

4. Eckel RH, Jakicic JM, Ard, JD, Hubbard VS, de Jesus JM, Lee IM, Lichtenstein AH, Loria CM, Millen BE, Houston Miller N, Nonas CA, Sacks FM, Smith SC Jr, Svetkey LP, Wadden TW, Yanovski SZ. 2013 American Heart Association®/ACC guideline on lifestyle management to reduce cardiovascular risk: a report of the American College of Cardiology American/Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines. Circulation. 2013;00:000–000.

5. Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010. http://www.cnpp.usda.gov/Publications/DietaryGuidelines/2010/PolicyDoc/PolicyDoc.pdf


Upcoming Events

 

Fruits & Veggies—More Matters® >

Find out how eating more fruits and veggies can help you eat well and stay healthy. See what some RD chefs are cooking up today!

What's in my Food? >

We are proud of the food we make, but know you may have questions about the ingredients we use. Here we try to answer them!

Campbell's® Chunky Baked Beans >

Celebrate National Baked Beans Month with fiber rich and delicious baked beans at your next cookout!

 
CLOSE

Suggest A Topic

Enter a topic here

50 characters remaining

Star your favorite topics below:

  • Organic

  • Genetically Modified Products

  • New Dietary Guidelines

  • Protein

  • Diabetes

  • Pediatric Nutrition

  • Sports Nutrition

  • High Fructose Corn Syrup

CLOSE

Suggest A Topic

Enter a topic here

50 characters remaining

Star your favorite topics below:

  • Organic

  • Genetically Modified Products

  • New Dietary Guidelines

  • Protein

  • Diabetes

  • Pediatric Nutrition

  • Sports Nutrition

  • High Fructose Corn Syrup

CLOSE

Suggest A Topic

Enter a topic here

50 characters remaining

Star your favorite topics below:

  • Organic

  • Genetically Modified Products

  • New Dietary Guidelines

  • Protein

  • Diabetes

  • Pediatric Nutrition

  • Sports Nutrition

  • High Fructose Corn Syrup

CLOSE

En Papillote Technique

1. Prepare the parchment paper
Get a large piece of parchment paper, approximately 2.5 times as large as a single portion of food. Cut the paper into a heart shape, lightly brushing one side with oil. This creates a slight barrier to water, preventing the paper from becoming soaked too quickly. Another option, though not as attractive, is to use tin foil instead of parchment paper.

2. Select the ingredients
This is a very quick-cooking approach, so it works best with tender proteins such as fish and shellfish. The accompanying ingredients, like julienned vegetables (matchstick size), must be small enough to cook at the same rate as the fish. In some cases the vegetables can be blanched, or quickly cooked in boiling water, to ensure proper doneness. Fresh herbs will go a long way in providing flavor.

3. Assemble the packet
Lay the oiled, heart-shaped paper on a baking tray, oiled side up. Season your vegetables with salt, pepper, extra virgin olive oil, and half of the herbs. Toss them around for an even coat. Place enough for one portion on half of the paper. Bunch them up to create a bed for your fish, leaving about two inches between the food and the edge of the paper. Place the seasoned fish on the vegetables and sprinkle the remaining herbs. Add a splash of the liquid on top of the fish, just enough to add moisture.

4. Seal the packet
To seal, fold the heart over to enclose the fish and vegetables (so it resembles a teardrop). Starting at the top of the heart, fold about 1/4" of the edge toward the center. Fold over again to create a seal. Continue along the length of the parchment, folding each section twice. When you get to the point of the heart, twist and fold to finish the seal.

5. Bake your dinner
Bake the packet in a 425°F oven for 10-14 minutes, depending on the size of the fish. The packet will puff and brown while in the oven and as the steam builds. When cooked, remove from the oven and carefully place the packet on a plate. With a knife or scissors cut an "X" on the top and fold back the edges for a dramatic presentation and a delicious, healthy meal.

CLOSE

Spicy Flounder and Clams with Summer Vegetables

Prep Time: Less than 20 minutes
Cooking Time: 10-14 minutes
Yield: 2 servings

Ingredients:

  • 1/3 cup carrots, finely cut julienne
  • 1/3 cup sugar snap peas, cross cut thinly
  • 1/3 cup zucchini, yellow, finely cut julienne
  • 6 each cherry tomatoes, cut in half
  • 1 Tbsp. shallot, minced
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tsp. parsley, fresh, minced
  • Dash salt
  • Dash black pepper
  • 6 oz. fillet, flounder (2 fillets, 3oz. each)
  • 2 Tbsp. Low Sodium Spicy Hot V8® 100% Vegetable juice
  • 3/4 lb. clams, in the shell

Instructions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 425°F.
  2. Combine the carrots, sugar snap peas, zucchini, cherry tomatoes, shallot, garlic, extra virgin olive oil, half of the parsley, salt and pepper in a bowl. Toss well to combine.
  3. Lightly oil two large heart shaped pieces of parchment paper.
  4. With the parchment paper on a sheet tray, place half of the vegetable mixture in the center of one half of each heart leaving about a 2" border.
  5. Lightly season each fillet with salt and pepper. Fold or roll the fillet to create a uniform thickness and place on top of the vegetables.
  6. Top the fish with the remaining herbs and the Low Sodium Spicy Hot V8® 100% Vegetable juice.
  7. Place half of the clams around each portion of vegetables and fish.
  8. Fold the heart over to enclose the fish and vegetables so that it resembles a teardrop.
  9. Starting at the top of the heart, fold about 1/4" of the edge towards the center. Fold over again to create a seal.
  10. Continue with this method along the length of the parchment packet folding each section twice to make an attractive edge.
  11. When you get to the point of the heart twist and fold to finish the seal.
  12. Bake the packets for 10-14 minutes (depending on the thickness of the fish).
  13. Remove from the oven and serve by cutting an "X" in the top and folding back the edges.

Nutrition Information (per serving):

Calories 180, Total Fat 9g, Saturated Fat 1g, Monounsaturated Fat 5g, Polyunsaturated Fat 1g, Cholesterol 50mg, Sodium 450mg, Carbohydrate 10g, Fiber 2g, Sugar 4g, Protein 16g.